1. The "Tom"


    Date: 7/30/2016, Categories: Exhibitionism, Author: Easthamptonpoet4u, Source: LushStories

    At Annie Burke’s cocktail party that evening, the sole topic seemed to be the peeping tom. As Annie carried two vodka tonics from the deck down to the lawn she was within earshot of one conversation about “the Tom,” (as the men usually said), when she heard another one about “the peeper," (as the women usually said). Nearing a grouping of Adirondack chairs, she heard Julie Davidson say: “It has to be a local Holcombe guy. You’ll see when he’s caught. They think the summer women are all models.” Holcombe was the name of both the lake and the village on its eastern shore. It was a good-sized lake, but with only one other community and that was on its western shore. All other property was owned by the state, which wasn’t selling - a policy that existing homeowners thought was environmentally sound and commendably far-sighted. The geography made the Holcombe summer community relatively isolated and close-knit. Annie’s party, like most during the summer, had no guest list; it was simply announced. In practice, that meant all the summer people came but few from the village. There were exceptions, however, and tonight the exception was Gregory Makis, Holcombe’s chief of police. That was no accident, Annie had invited him. Now, she called out, “Whose vodka tonics am I serving?” and all heads turned. The men’s smiles were quick and charming. Annie was the only single woman in the summer set, both a bit of a mystery and a challenge. Tonight, her chestnut hair was in a ponytail, swept ...
    back from an exceptionally pretty face with a smooth, perfect jawline and blue eyes that smiled all by themselves, with or without assistance from very serviceable lips. But her weekend guests were either her sister and brothers or a woman friend. To all appearances, though, there was nothing romantic - and so the “mystery” and the sense, if not the actuality, (all the summer men were married) of the “challenge.” “The problem,” Julie said when she and Police Chief Makis had claimed the drinks, “is the woods between the houses and all those zigzagging paths between houses and down to the lake. No wonder the police can’t catch him.” “And they won’t,” said Bob Eckels, “until we widen those paths enough for a patrol car.” He glanced around the group with a certain aggressiveness. Annie was about to head back to the deck but paused to listen. There was a reason she had invited Gregory Makis. Now, he said, amiably, “If that is meant to imply we haven’t caught him because the men won’t get out the cars, then I protest. We’ve given chase on foot several occasions. Julie’s right: too much woods, too many paths, no lights.” Bob Eckels rolled his head back and closed his eyes in what might have been a prayer for patience. “How come 'the Tom' runs these trails faster than your guys?” For Chief Makis’s case, it did not help that now, as he smiled, his big double chin pressed down on his chest and his glass rested lightly on the ledge of his stomach. But Julie Davidson broke in with, “It’s ...
«1234...11»