1. Power Chapter 35: Joining the NBA


    Date: 6/22/2016, Categories: Bisexual, Author: marktreble, Source: LushStories

    Story to date: Mark enters college a virgin knowing nothing about sex or women. The college is remarkably permissive with public nudity and sex commonplace. Within a few days Mark falls in lust with Janice. As the first semester unfolds he develops an increasingly intimate relationship with his male roommate. His girlfriend leaves him for a friend, Drew, and Mark hooks up with actual love: Sylvia. Second semester his relationships deepen and he learns more about himself and his environment. Over the next summer he and Drew room together and start a business before Drew becomes mentally ill. Sophomore year the business expands rapidly, and Mark's sexual partners (both female and male) increase. Near the end of the first semester Sylvia uncovers a likely cure for Drew's illness. It works and he returns to help run the business. Nate joins the group, then his girlfriend as the Chief Financial Officer. Both fit in remarkably well with the FWB atmosphere. Drew polled the faculty. What kinds of business services could an Anthony student provide based on his or her major? It turned out to be almost endless. We had decided to set up a Liquid Autumn job brokering website for Anthony students. Students put together profiles and skills lists and examples of the kinds of work they could do. I started programming the website but Sylvia stopped me. “Mark, you’re a mathematician,” she said. “I love you, but your programming skills are kind of like a first-grader with crayons trying to stay ...
    within the lines. You can afford to hire somebody better.” We hired computer science majors at $25 an hour and quickly had a winner. Students working directly for us on no-brainer stuff like indexing got $15 an hour. We were paying Nate $25 an hour for his work. Marcy suggested that this be standard for every professional worker gerbil, and that they be charged out to local businesses at $45 an hour. I did the math (it was my major, after all). We’d make $20 an hour minus overhead for a couple hours a week times a few Anthony students. This all sounded like last summer’s grass watering job. We took out an ad in the Ledger and sent out flyers. When the four hundredth Anthony student signed up I re-did the math. That was the end of the second week. Chemists and graphic artists were the first to be hired, and computer programmers followed quickly. Not everybody got work, but the first four hundred averaged four hours a week each. The website was a million dollar a year business on its own. When we started allowing for fixed price work, our net doubled in one quarter. The computer sciences and business faculty helped some enterprising students set up a business services company with one client: us. They uploaded profiles, maintained the website, enabled job listings, answered phones and e-mails. We paid them a flat rate plus transaction fees. It was easier than hourly. A couple of years later we started reselling their work world-wide. That alone was $17 million the first year. ...
«123»